Drilling first deep well announcement

Utah FORGE Drills First of Two Deep Wells

The Utah Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE), is excited to announce that the drilling of its first highly deviated deep well has commenced. Highly deviated wells are frequently drilled for oil and gas production, but not by the geothermal industry. The Utah FORGE team will be the first to tackle this challenge while drilling in hot, hard crystalline granite.

The upper part of the well will be drilled vertically through approximately 4,700 feet of  sediments at which point it will penetrate into hard crystalline granite. At about 6,000 feet, the well will be gradually steered at a 5° angle for each 100 feet until it reaches an inclination of 65° from its vertical point. The total length of the well will be approximately 11,000 feet with the “toe” – or the end of the well – reaching a vertical depth of 8,500 feet. The temperature at this depth will be 440°F.

“This is an exciting phase in the Utah FORGE project and is key to proving Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technologies are commercially viable” said Joseph Moore, PhD, and Principal Investigator of Utah FORGE.

The goal of our research is to test tools and technologies for the creation of a geothermal resource where none exists naturally. Developing cost effective EGS technologies is an important step in capturing the enormous energy potential beneath our feet and bringing low cost, environmentally green, and renewable energy across the United States.

Once the well is completed, a series of tests will be run to facilitate the development of the EGS resource. Some of the tests will include determining the stress conditions through short-term injection experiments, during which microseismicity will be carefully monitored. Other tests will allow for the interpretation of the orientation and distribution of the existing and induced fractures in the granite, which will form the pathways for water to circulate and heat up in the newly created EGS reservoir.

The results of these tests and R&D activities will be used to plan the second deviated well. Drilling of the second well is tentatively scheduled for early 2022.

Open Press Release HERE

ARMA June 2020 ROBE Talk

 

Pengju Xing (EGI) gave a talk 'Using Flowback and Temperature for Closure Stress Diagnosis' for the American Rock Mechanics Association's (ARMA)  800-member Hydraulic Fracturing Technical community on June 10, 2020. This was part of the ROBE talk series.

Watch it HERE

Modeling and Simulation Forum #2 RECORDING

Utah FORGE Modeling and Simulation Forum #2

"Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation Patterns in the FORGE Reservoir Using Multiple Stochastic DFN Realizations and Variable Stress Conditions" presented by Aleta Finnila (Golder)

May 20 at 11 am MDT

The presentation includes a summary of the current FORGE reference DFN and the sensitivity work performed to find average and end-member DFN realizations for hydraulic stimulation of the new well 16A(78)-32. There is a discussion of how the DFN can be used by other modelers and what type of filters should be used on the DFN in order to extract the best set of fractures for a particular simulation goal.The presentation includes a summary of the current FORGE reference DFN and the sensitivity work performed to find average and end-member DFN realizations for hydraulic stimulation of the new well 16A(78)-32. There is a discussion of how the DFN can be used by other modelers and what type of filters should be used on the DFN in order to extract the best set of fractures for a particular simulation goal.

This is the second forum of the series and is intended to have an open format to present modeling and simulation, both completed and planned, as well as activities being conducted by the Utah FORGE Team. This webinar has been recorded and is now available for viewing.

UPDATE: Audio recording has been fixed. Enjoy the full version.

The pdf of the presentation is available 20200516_MSForum-post.

References mentioned:

  • For details on the FORGE DFN development:

Finnila, A., Forbes, B., and Podgorney, R.: Building and Utilizing a Discrete Fracture Network Model of the FORGE Utah Site, Proceedings, 44th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (2019).

  • Details on sensitivity work for stochastic realization and stress state:

Finnila, A., and R.K. Podgorney. 2020. Exploring hydraulic fracture stimulation patterns in the FORGE reservoir using multiple stochastic DFN realizations and variable stress conditions. In Proceedings, 45th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

  • Mentioned, but it isn't central in this presentation:

Xing, P., Duane, W, Rickard, B., Barker, B., Finnila, A., Ghassemi, A., Pankow, K., Podgorney, R., Moore, J., Goncharov, A., McLennan, J.: Interpretation of In-Situ Injection Measurements at the FORGE Site, Proceedings, 45th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (2020).

  • Other supporting information for the Forum, details on the reference earth and native state models can be found on the Earth Model  and  Numerical Modeling  pages.

To view the 1st forum as well as the schedule of upcoming webinars visit the Modeling and Simulation Forum page.

To receive updates and special announcements please SUBSCRIBE

Modeling and Simulation Forum #1 RECORDING

The inaugural Modeling and Simulation Forum was held on April 15, 2020 and if you weren't able to participate you can check out the video recording of the webinar below.

Topics that were covered included an overview of the Utah FORGE project, a description of the numerical methods and codes that have used, a summary of modelling results dealing with discrete fracture network, the distribution of stress, and the planning of well trajectories.

Download the PDF of the slides:

20200415_MSForum-post

This will be a recurring event to keep the EGS community updated on our activities and, most importantly, to gain the community's feedback.

For more information about upcoming webinars visit the Modeling and Simulation Forum page

For news, special announcement about the Utah FORGE project activities please SUBSCRIBE

Utah FORGE Solicitation Announcement

University of Utah and Utah FORGE Announce Solicitation

The University of Utah and Utah FORGE are pleased to announce FORGE Solicitation 2020-1. This is the first formal call for research proposals on enhanced geothermal systems technologies from the FORGE program. Up to 18 awards are anticipated for up to a total of $46,000,000.

A pre-recorded informational webinar to further outline the scope of the solicitation is now available. NO registration required. Please go to the Solicitations page for posted link to the webinar.

The submission deadline for the two-page Concept Papers has been set for 2:00 PM MDT, May 27, 2020.

You’ll find all the details about the solicitation, where to register, how to download the full document, and how to submit your application:

HERE

 

Introducing Modeling and Simulation Forum

The Utah FORGE Team is pleased to announce the inaugural FORGE Modeling and Simulation Forum commencing April 15 at 11 am MDT.  It is intended to be an open forum to present modeling and simulation, both completed and planned, activities being conducted by the Utah FORGE Team. The Forum will be a recurring event (frequency to be determined) which will help to keep the EGS community updated on our activities and, most importantly, to gain the community's feedback.

In preparation for the Forum, details on the reference earth and native state models can be found at the following links:

Earth Model

Numerical Modeling

The Forum will be hosted by Dr. Robert Podgorney, the modeling and simulation lead for the Utah FORGE team.  Registration is required, please sign-up via link below

 

Hearing: Water and Geothermal Power

"...The thermal energy beneath our feet is enormous (...) if we could capture even 2% of the thermal energy at depths between 2 and 6 miles, we would have more than 2000 times the yearly amount of energy used in the U.S. ..."

 

Dr. Joseph Moore, Manager and PI of the FORGE project gives testimony on geothermal to the Subcommittee on Energy of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology at a hearing titled "Water and Geothermal Power: Unearthing the Next Wave of Energy Innovation"
The purpose of this hearing is to examine research, development and demonstration needs for advancing water power and geothermal energy technologies.

Read the full testimony here

View and listen to the full hearing here

 

 

STAT formed for FORGE Initiative

Science and Technology Analysis Team Formed for FORGE Initiative.

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative, a diverse group of experts, referred to as the Science and Technology Analysis Team (STAT), has been formed to support the Utah FORGE team. The STAT is comprised of the following members:

  • Doug Blankenship (Chair) – Sandia National Laboratories
  • Joseph Morris (Vice Chair) – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
  • Kate Baker – Independent Consultant
  • Stephen Hickman – U.S. Geological Survey
  • Mack Kennedy – Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • George King – GEK Engineering PLLC
  • Ernest Majer – Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Affiliate
  • Jean-Claude Roegiers – Independent Consultant
  • Eric Sonnenthal – Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Herbert Wang – University of Wisconsin, Madison

The STAT provides technical guidance to ensure that the Geothermal Technologies Office’s (GTO) objectives are considered and incorporated into the execution of FORGE and associated research and development (R&D). Specifically, the STAT will assess R&D needs in accordance with GTO roadmaps and goals, establish technical baseline information and performance specifications, review ongoing site characterization and monitoring efforts, develop topics for recurring FORGE R&D solicitations, provide guidance for review and selection of R&D projects, and develop out-year R&D strategies. The STAT will also assess the progress and results of R&D technology and techniques implemented at FORGE and provide input to the Utah FORGE team for the development of annual reports.

In April, the STAT convened for the first time in Salt Lake City. In addition to members of STAT, personnel from DOE and the Utah FORGE team also attended. The meeting served as a powerful reminder of the potential of the FORGE initiative to advance EGS to a place of commercial readiness. Initial public outputs of the meeting will be the release of the first round of FORGE R&D funding opportunity announcements (FOAs), scheduled for later in calendar year 2019.

FORGE will be a dedicated site where the subsurface science and engineering community will be able to develop, test and improve new technologies and techniques directed at the development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).

The Geothermal Technologies Office would like to thank the University of Utah team and the STAT members for their hard work and leadership. Their contributions serve as a powerful reminder of the potential of advancing EGS to a place of commercial readiness through this groundbreaking initiative!